Abrams Falls Trail

Abrams Falls is a fantastic hike! photo credit - gsmnp

Abrams Falls is a fantastic hike! Photo credit – gsmnp

Abrams Falls Trail has it all! The 20-foot Abrams Falls is an amazing natural wonder and a rewarding rewarding hike! The five-mile round-trip Abrams Fall Trail, located in Cades Cove, is classified as a moderate to difficult trek due to several ascending and descending ridges along the way. Those accustomed to a bit more challenging hikes will be rewarded when they reach the imposing 20-foot waterfall.

The trailhead is accessed at the back of a grassy field about half way around the Cades Cove Loop road and begins at a wooden bridge. Bear right after the bridge to visit the historic Elijah Oliver Place. Like other cabins in the cove, the Oliver place is a perfectly preserved homestead, offering a glimpse of life for early cove settlers.

Back to the main trail, turn left and follow the well-marked path that runs parallel to beautiful Abrams Creek, and leads through a variety of natural growth that includes hemlocks, a pine-oak forest and massive growths of rhododendron (referred to as a “hell” of rhododendron by anyone who has ever hiked through them.)

The trail, which marks an elevation gain of 340 feet and is home to numerous scenic overlooks, has a total elevation change of about 1,800 feet with the combined ascents and descents. It also crosses three narrow log bridges. Pets and bicycles are prohibited on the trail.

Proper hiking gear is a must for any hike. Check out our great blog on “Hiking Essentials” to make sure you and your family are prepared for this hike or any other Smoky Mountain adventure.

Many visitors are tempted to swim in the enticing pool located at the base of the falls. Be Warned; the volume of water thundering over the cliffs of Abrams Falls creates dangerous undertows and strong currents. Climbing on or near the falls is also not a good idea. Rocks surrounding both the falls and the pool below are coated in mist and algae and are extremely slippery and sometimes unstable. Over the years, several people have fallen to their deaths, and many other suffered serious injuries from climbing on rocks near waterfalls. Backpacker Magazine has listed Abrams Falls Trail as one of the ten most dangerous hikes in America, citing numerous deaths that include drownings (a fatality occurred in 2006 when a “strong” swimmer disappeared near the base of the falls. He was pulled under and his body never resurfaced.) The article noted that a total of 29 water-related deaths have occurred on this trail since 1971.  According to a park spokesperson, Abrams Falls is an attractive destination that is easily reached by a 2.5-mile hike, but has strong currents and hidden hazards beneath the water that can trap unsuspecting swimmers. Lightning strikes and extreme weather changes have also proved deadly. When spending any time in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park, caution is your friend. Check weather forecasts before heading out; stay on the trail; when encountering wildlife, keep a respectable distance; and never cross streams above waterfalls (people have been swept over the falls after losing their footing in little more than ankle-deep water). You should wear sturdy footwear, be prepared for sudden inclement weather and take drinking water and snacks. Keep a close watch on your children.  It takes about 3-4 hours for most people who hike this trail so if you begin in late afternoon, you could end up hiking back in the dark.

Directions: Enter the one-way Cades Cove loop and travel about five miles. Just beyond the Abrams Creek Crossing and stop #10, turn right onto a grave road that crosses between grassy fields. The Abrams Falls Trail Parking lot is located at the end of the road and the trailhead is just a few steps away.

5th Annual Wears Valley Fall Festival

Wears Valley fall fest

Wears Valley fall fest is a great family friendly event!

5th Annual Wears Valley Fall Festival is fun for the entire family! Sixteen acres of family fun including crafters, storytelling, interactive activities, entertainment, children’s events and great food awaits all in attendance October 19-21, 2018 at the 5th Annual Wears Valley Fall Festival coordinated by Keep Sevier Beautiful.  The wide array of activities at this year’s event will give families a great way to make memories, experience a variety of fun activities and enjoy the incredible beauty of fall in the Smokies.

This year’s event begins on Friday, October 19 and continues through Sunday, October 21.  Hours are from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Sunday.  A single day pass is the nice price of only three dollars. The festival site is next to Tennessee State Bank off Route 321 in Wears Valley in Sevier County.

Get ready for some great live music! The center stage features free live singers including country, southern gospel, Elvis, and much more!

Wears Valley Fall Fest features an Antique Tractor Show and rides for the kids. What make this particular fall festival so unique are the opportunities for fun while learning stewardship for our natural resources. The Kids’ Tent features free crafts that kids of all ages can make. The crafts all show kids how to make things from repurposed items such as t-shirt bags, Christmas and fall decor, and much more! Kids also can play games made from recycled and repurposed items. Ring toss, checkers, and many games will keep the kids entertained. Want a high energy adventure?  Take them through the obstacle course or one of the inflatables!

There will be a wide variety of exhibitors and vendors at the festival showing off their artwork and jewelry as well as live demonstrations of metal crafts, basket making, and woodworking. Don’t worry about going hungry, there’ll be plenty of kettle corn, candy apples, and fried Twinkies for dessert first, then you can enjoy some grilled chicken or steak on a stick. If Italian or Greek food twangs your buds you are in luck at the fest. There is something for everything.

Great Smoky Mountains Purchase Knob Stargazing Event

Purchase Knob stargazing in Great Smoky Mountains National Park!

Purchase Knob stargazing in Great Smoky Mountains National Park!

Great Smoky Mountains Purchase Knob stargazing event. Great Smoky Mountains National Park will host a stargazing event at the Appalachian Highlands Science Learning Center beginning at 7:00 pm on Friday, October 5, 2018. Located on beautiful Purchase Knob, the learning center provides one of the best views of the sky in the Smokies and Haywood County, NC.

The Astronomy Club of Asheville will lead an exploration of the night sky at this high elevation site with a 260-degree unobstructed view of the sky. The club will provide a variety of telescopes for the participants to use. If skies are clear, visitors can expect to see the Milky Way Galaxy high overhead that night, along with the planets Saturn and Mars, the Andromeda Galaxy, and many striking star clusters. This is a great opportunity for families to explore the universe without leaving terra firma.

National Park areas often offer a wonderful opportunity to stargaze,” said Superintendent Cassius Cash. “Parks across the country monitor and manage for natural night sky conditions in much the same way as we do to protect our air and water. Visitors are often amazed at the number of stars that can be seen simply by entering into the natural darkness of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The event starts with an indoor presentation, which will be held rain or shine, to discuss what can be seen in October skies. Following the presentation participants will become acquainted with the telescopes and begin to stargaze. The learning center is located at 5,000 feet in elevation and it will be chilly. Visitors are encouraged dress in warm layers. The program is free but limited to 80 people. Reservations are required and can be made by registering through Eventbrite, at STARGAZING, or by calling 828-497-1946.

Purchase Knob is easy to find, located off US 276 near Maggie Valley, North Carolina. The use of GPS or an internet map service to find Purchase Knob is not recommended, but park staff can provide reliable directions when visitors make reservations.

Bearly 5K Run/Walk

Bearly 5K is your chance to help save orphaned bear cubs.

Bearly 5K is your chance to help save orphaned bear cubs.

Bearly 5K Run/Walk is your chance to get moving and help save orphaned black bear cubs! Mark your calendars for Saturday, October 27, 2018.

This Smoky Mountain special event will be fun for the entire family. It is the time of year that ghouls and goblins emerge from the mists of the Smoky Mountains so Halloween costumes are welcome for race participants. If you are not into dressing up come as you are or wear your favorite ABR 5K shirt. A prize will be awarded for the best dressed runner!

This will be a fun, family-friendly event!! Runner/Walkers will not be timed, but the first three runners arriving back at Trillium Cove will be awarded a special ABR prize. The race will be held at the Appalachian Bear Rescue Visitor and Education Center, 121 Painted Trillium Way,
Townsend, TN.

The registration fee is a donation to Appalachian Bear Rescue and includes a free pancake breakfast for hungry runners and a 2018 5K T-Shirt!

Early bird registration: July 1, 2018 – September 2, 2018: $35
Registration: September 3, 2018 – October 26, 2018: $45
Registration day of event: $50

The online registration will end Friday, October 26th at 10am. You will be able to sign up the day of the race on site. Registration on race day starts at 8:30am on October 27th.

HeySmokies.com is a proud sponsor of this event and encourages all runners and walkers to save the date! Come join the fun and bring your friends and family! The backdrop of Great Smoky Mountains National Park makes this event one of the most beautiful in the area!

Giant Hogweed Invades Smoky Mountain Region

Giant Hogweed invades the Smoky Mountain region.

Giant Hogweed invades the Smoky Mountain region and it can be a real pain! Photo credit – Daily Mirror

Giant Hogweed Invades Smoky Mountain Region. Giant Hogweed looms large on it’s march toward the Smokies. Giant Hogweed can reach up to 20-feet in height and is considered extremely dangerous. It can cause 3rd degree burns and blindness. Typically found in multiple places along the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions and now near the Smoky Mountains. Recently Virginia Tech researchers have identified Giant Hogweed in Clarke County Virginia and Wautauga County, North Carolina near the Tennessee line. According to Diane Watwick, Urban Watershed Forester for the Tennessee Department of Agriculture and Forestry, there have been no reported or confirmed sightings of the infamous plant in East Tennessee to date.

Hogweed bears a striking resemblance to Queen Anne’s lace on steroids and is sometimes mistaken for elderberry or cow parsnips-both of which look similar and grow readily in the Smoky Mountain region but rarely exceed 6-feet in height.

Hogweed, whose growth period last from mid May thru July, features huge spiky leaves, which can measure 5-feet in width, and a umbrella-shaped cluster of white flower heads that may exceed 2-5 feet in diameter. According to the USDA Forest Services, USDA and Plant Health Inspection Service, the Giant Hogweed can also be identified by unusual 2-4 inch diameter hollow stems that feature hairy bristles and maroon spots.

Contact with the plant’s clear watery sap can prove disastrous. Symptoms, which can take from 3-5 days to appear, include painful fluid-filled blisters resembling burns, and phytophotodermatitis, which can make skin sensitive to ultraviolet light for years following exposure to Hogweed’s broken stems, roots, flowers, seeds or leaves.

Native to the Caucasus Mountain range in Asia, Hogweed was introduced to other parts of the world through collections in botanical gardens where its escape into other areas proved easy.

The Great Smoky Mountain region, with its miles of wild areas and abundant varieties of vegetation, just might prove the perfect incubator for the monstrous plant which produces some 100,000 seeds annually that are then spread by the wind or running water and can remain viable in the soil for up to 10 years.

Best advice is do not come into contact with any part of this plant and if you think you have identified a Giant Hogweed contact the UT Agriculture extension office at 865-974-7114